Massive Cargo Ships Trapped at 29 U.S. Ports?

February 22, 2015 - 10:28am
Image from Gizmodo.com Image from Gizmodo.com

Wondering where those games you preordered are?  The long wait for that big box expansion...those mini expansions for your favorite new game...is excruciating--trust me, we know. And just what in cyberspace is going on? A recent article on Gizmodo explains it quite well: those massive cargo ships off the California coast being stuck in those ports?  It's still going on. In 29 U.S. shipping ports off the west coast, cargo ships sit idly, anchored just off the coastline, paralyzed and unable to unload.  This is preventing the long line of freight trucks waiting at the ports from receiving their cargo to ship it to your favorite FLGS or OLGS.  All this is due to the continuing dispute between the International Longshore and Warehouse Union or ILWU, which represents 20,000 highly-skilled, highly-paid dockworkers, and the Pacific Maritime Association, which is represents the shipping companies.
Image from Gizmodo.com Image from Gizmodo.com

The docks were closed over the weekend as just one way of expressing the ILWU's position, and, according to the LA Times, there are now 33 ships anchored along the coast and 55 stuck in port.  The two sides of the dispute form a symbiotic relationship, and a resolution just doesn't seem to be getting any closer to reality.  It has become such an issue that Presidential intervention in the dispute has also been discussed. And what about our rail system, what ever happened to that?  Well, the American railroad system has been stretched to its breaking point due to a heavy reliance on trains to ship oil across the country, leaving little room for other freight. This problem is not just separating us gamers from our preciously awaited rectangular, cardboard boxes. Retailers of all kinds of struggling to keep their shelves stocked with merchandise that they have been waiting far to long for. To read more about this dilemma, read Kelsey Campbell-Dollaghan's article on Gizmodo here.