Tim Armstrong

New from Floodgate Games is Bad Maps, a programing game with a pirate theme.  In Bad Maps, players are pirate captains with hidden objective that award points based on where certain pirate minions are on the map in relation to the buried treasure on the island.  Each round, the players give instructions to the minions by playing a map piece from their hands.  Some map pieces are played face up and some are played faced down, preventing other players from knowing exactly where each minion will be on the island during that step.  Once all the instructions for the minion’s map have been given, the minions execute each step of their instructions on their maps, moving closer or further from the treasure, or falling victim to pits.  Once all the minions have completed their movement, the captains score their objective and the minions dig pits (looking for treasure). The second round begins with a much more hazardous island.  The captain with the most points at the end of the game is the winner.  Bad Maps is designed by Tim Armstrong, designer of Orbis and Kaiju Crush, and is wonderfully illustrated by Kristen Pauline, who also illustrated Stuffed Fables.

Bad Maps plays 3-5 players (but includes a 2 player mode), ages 13+, in about 40 minutes. Contents include a double-sides island board, 5 Captain player boards, 45 map cards, 40 objective cards, 10 blackout cards (shows which maps cards will be face up or face down), 10 spyglass tokens, 4 minion markers, 4 minion start tokens, a first mate token, a first player token, and 8 pit markers.

Bad Maps was successfully kickstarted back in September 2018 with a projected delivery of March 2019. If you missed the kickstarter campaign, it is available for pre-order now, or you can look for the game at your friendly local game store in March 2019.

 

Fireside Games has announced Kaiju Crush, a light strategy monster combat game from Tim Armstrong and Justin De Witt (Castle Panic). In Kaiju Crush, 2-4 players pick from 4 Kaiju, each with special abilities, and each turn move on the board of city tiles, either with their own movement card or with a shared movement card. Players then crush the city tile (building) they are on and replace it with one of their territory markers. Combat between Kaiju on adjacent spaces, or in dispute over a territory marker, uses a unique 5-symbol rock-paper-scissors method of comparing attacks on drawn combat markers. The game ends when Kaiju cannot move on their turn. Points are generated from combat, territory held, and completing patterns of territory shown on shared objective cards. The player with the most victory points reigns supreme.

Kaiju Crush is expected in stores on November 1, 2017.