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magination kids

Creativity starts with Magination. The game consists of different magnetic pieces that can be used to play a variety of games. You can think of Magination like a magnetic deck of cards, where you’re not only getting one game, but a toolset that allows you to play an unlimited amount of games. Unlike a deck of cards is it much easier to be creative and find unique ways to play. You can also use the pieces to build magnetic structures and experiment to find new ways to embrace the magnetic force.

Have you ever taken those round, circular magnets from the refrigerator and fiddled with them, watching them push each other apart, finding the perfect distance at which they would suck themselves together?  If so, then you will instantly relate to this brand new, innovative game system coming from Norway known as Magination.

magtension

Magination currently consists of three types of magnetic components: the Single, Double, and Triple.  Each component contains one or more magnets specially designed to interact with each other in smooth, consistent, and fascinating ways.  Players can push, pull, shoot, connect and stack the magnets upon each other, which leads to an endless flow of possible games and activities.

The Magination system currently contains a variety of standard games to play with the magnets, including magCURLING (just like it sounds, tabletop curling with magnets), magTENSION, and magTHROW (bouncing and tossing the magnets over a magnetic bridge).  Magination is designed to promote player creativity, and will include a web-based forum for uploading new games, rating games submitted by others, and accessing a pool of new ways to play on a regular basis.

Magination is sold in modules, each being specially balanced to interact well with all components in the module.  Kickstarter backers can pledge at multiple levels, each level containing various assortments of modules.  Various stretch goals are also included in this project, including backer-selected color schemes and additional components.

All components for Magination are designed and produced in Norway, with an emphasis on the quality and safety of the components.

This project is set to fund on December 18, 2015, with a delivery date of April 2016.  For more information and to support the Magination project, visit the Kickstarter site here.

Courtesy BGG user Kataclysm

 

Keith Burgun has published an article on his personal blog, keithburgun.net: Thoughts on Game Design, in which he presents his perspective on Eurogames–namely, why he believes that many Eurogames are simply better suited as solitaire game experiences.

Burgun begins by defining Eurogame as “a term that loosely refers to a system-oriented, often highly deterministic boardgame, usually coming out of Europe.”  He then describes this type of game as one that, contrasting with the popular term Amerit(h)rash, does not concern itself with a strong theme or storyline.  Instead, it focuses on helping players develop a “machine”, or game engine, that drives the game and presents players with interesting decisions to make.

One reason Burgun believes Eurogames to be a strong solo-player experience is due to a common lack of true player interaction; in short, many Eurogames are often dubbed “multi-player solitaire.”  He goes on to explain that even though it is possible to thwart the progress or limit the decisions of other players in a Eurogame, much of the focus is on one’s own progress, engine-development, and point accumulation.

Burgun points out that one reason for a smaller number of solitaire games on the board game market could be that setting up a board game to play by oneself can seem strange to most people.  He also draws some connections and comparisons to digital versions of board games and how they are used for solo-player gaming experiences.  Burgun finishes his article by encouraging board game designers to focus more on solitaire experiences in their game designs.

To read the article in full, read it here on Keith Burgun’s blog.