Programming

Army of Darkness: The Board Game is an upcoming major release from Lynnvander Studios and Dynamite Entertainment covering the cult-classic third film in the Evil Dead trilogy. While not a lot is known about the game yet, prepare for chainsaw and S-Mart jokes for 1-4 players wreaking havoc for an hour to 90 minutes, with an intended age of 10 or older.

Not to be confused with either the 1993 board game called Army of Darkness, nor the 2004 game Army of Darkness Card Game, Army of Darkness: The Board Game (2018) will bring in highly detailed miniatures and all-new boomstick battles against the Deadites! Plus, the Board Game Geek (BGG) page states that players…

“…play as Ash and his allies, and work together to fight off swarms of Deadites commanded by Evil Ash and Evil Shiela.” 

BGG also lists the game as dice rolling, co-op, and involving programmed movement, which leads to an exciting combination of game mechanisms that will need some clarification once everything is finalized to have an idea of exactly how it will all come together – but so far, sounds groovy.

Designed by the team of Josh Derksen, Thomas M. Gofton, and Aron Murch who have been published many times by Jasco Games in the past, collectively working on titles such as:  Albion’s Legacy, Cyber:Run, and another game handling a beloved intellectual property in Buffy the Vampire Slayer: The Board Game.

While no official release date has been announced, more about Army of Darkness: The Board Game can be learned from Nerdist’s article by clicking here.

prime time

Always thought you could pick and schedule TV shows better than the network executives? Here is your chance in Prime Time: The Broadcasting Tycoons, a new game on Kickstarter from Golden Egg Games, designed by Elad Goldsteen, with artwork by Naomi Robinson.

In Prime Time, 2-4 players take on the role of TV executives, charged with scheduling shows to win time slots by achieving the highest ratings among certain demographics, generating revenue and advertising dollars, and meeting the expectations of the corporate suits. The game plays in 30 minutes per player.

The game is played in six rounds, divided into two 3 round ‘seasons’. Each round consists of four phases; the Development phase, ; the Broadcast phase; and an Income phase. After the 3rd and 6th rounds, there is an Awards phase included in the round. In each round, players will earn victory points and money for their shows. After the 6th round, the players add 1 VP for every $3 they have in money. Highest total of VP’s at the end of round 6 wins the game.

prime time board

Prime Time combines a worker placement mechanism with a card system. In the Development phase, players have three actions they can use to take spaces on the board that give them certain benefits, such as a new demographic through PR, firing talent, or R&D. Some spots—shows and talents—are resolved by auction once all the actions are taken. Show and talents are defined by demographics, star quality, and genre, allowing players to plan their TV schedule strategy. If you lose the auction for a particular show, have no fear. You can move your action token to another untaken show or talent, or use it for another available action.

The heart of the game is the Broadcasting phase, where players schedule their shows for certain nights and times, assign talent to the shows, and compete to accumulate demographic cubes—which come in different colors of pink, brown, yellow, green, blue, and black wild card tokens—on their shows by matching their supply of shows and stars with the demographic demands. Once all the shows with demographic cubes all filled, any shows without cubes are ‘cancelled’ and discarded, entitling the player to a re-run card (yes, there are re-runs even in a board game). Any talent without cubes will be returned to the players hand during clean up and can reassigned, or fired, in the next round.

Having shows that people watch, indicated by the number and variety of cubes, allows player to earn money and compete for clients who will choose to advertise with you for bonus money. Demographic cubes also determine the ratings winner for each day. The hottest shows, talent and executives will eventually help a player win awards and VPs during the Awards phase after rounds three and six.

Once all the phases are done, the cubes are removed, money is earned, empty talent cards returned to the players hands, and the board is cleared for the next round. After the 6th round, the game ends and the player with the highest VP total is the winner.

The game looks good, and one of the stretch goals (already reached) will provide higher quality cards, with a lot of components; a board, different types of cards, tokens, paper money and colored cubes. The text of the cards also make it clear that the designer and artist have their tongues firmly in their cheeks, with a show called Talently featuring the worst singers and dancers competing for a prize, or the talent group The Long Hair Dudes.

The Kickstarter has a number of stretch goals that add extra shows, talent and executives to the mix that comes with the base game. The campaign has only two backer levels, and will be available in English and German. One backer level allows for pick up at this year’s Essen Fair. Otherwise, the scheduled delivery date in January 2016. The KS campaign runs until September 3, 2015, and can be found here.