Museum

A new distribution agreement has been struck to bring Horrible Games’ titles to the U.S. and Canada. The Italian-based publisher will have all games for the foreseeable future brought to North America by Canada-based publisher and distributor Luma Games. Horrible Games to be carried by this deal include hits like Potion Explosion, Dragon Castle, and Railroad Ink, but this will also include all future titles from the publisher as well. This is a mutually beneficial deal which will see more exposure for both companies across North America.

“Under the new agreement, Luma will distribute all our upcoming games, including Similo and The King’s Dilemma, and take over distribution of backlist games such as Potion Explosion, Dragon Castle, and Railroad Ink as existing stock sells down and new printings are done. Luma will also handle retail and event support for our catalog.”

Keen observers will notice that this is a huge boon for Horrible Games as Luma is taking over the exact same capacity that CMON did for all of their current catalog. While CMON will no longer be distributing the above-mentioned titles after the stock sells, the prolific publisher already has a release schedule and brand presence that is strong on it’s own. On the other hand, Luma has only been able to distribute a select few titles, such as Museum and Memoarrr!, and this partnership will surely escalate their outreach and footprint in the states through Horrible Games’ existing excellent catalog. If you’re interested in reading more about this distribution agreement, or want to learn more about Horrible Games or Luma Games, check out their websites for their own news posts and products.

 

After the previous kickstarter success of Rising 5, Museum and Outlaws, Holy Grail Games have a new project arriving on Kickstarter. A civilization game that will have a “domino” effect, not only as a physical mechanism but also how your race develops it’s knowledge and how you construct you empire.

“Dominations: Road to Civilization is a 2 – 4 player game by Olivier Melison and Eric Dubus. In this domino-based Civilisation building game, players take on the role of a primitive tribe, which they will seek to grow into a Nation whose influence will echo through the ages…

Place your triangular Dominos carefully to expand your population and obtain the Knowledge that will determine how your society is shaped over time. You can use this Knowledge to build Cities and master Skills; thus creating the legacy for which your Civilisation will be remembered. Each time you master a Skill, it becomes one of the pillars of your society, opening doors to new possibilities and increasing your power. The player with the most points at the end of the game wins!”

In detail, players have objective cards that relate to an early human race, like the Romans and Celtics, which need to be achieved by the third age. Each age is broken down into five rounds, in which you’ll be playing five of your seven, triangular shaped domino’s into the “Cradle Of Civilization.” Each domino will give you knowledge from the faces that are connected marking these on your knowledge track. Plus each domino creates a space for you to construct a city later in the game.  Knowledge comes in six forms, from science, trade, art, religion, government and craft. It is these assets that are use to build city’s and help construct wonders. And on top of that, you can spend them to build a tech tree that grants extra powers. But be careful not to spend all of your knowledge as it may give your opponents the upper hand in the next age, as the become experts in these fields where they have the most knowledge. Giving them an extra powers and points.

Three eras in, you will try to outbid the other player by boasting the number of objectives you have completed. Boast the most and gain extra points or loose them if you mistook your people as true followers of your cause. Add this to you current running  score with the bonuses for your city’s, tech tree, monuments and objectives to see who has domination of the other domains.

Running from the 28/6/2018 until 26/7/2018

For more detail, visit Holy Grail Games

or go direct to the kickstarter

 

A new publisher has entered the boardgame arena with the arrival of Luma Games.

Luma Games is a Canadian company based in Quebec with a team of people who have many years of experience in the boardgaming field. They have a lot of knowledge of Canadian distribution and French localization for the Quebec market, as well as some publishing expertise.

Now they have decided to branch out into publishing original titles as well as localized games.

They’ve also announced their first original game release, Museum.

Museum is designed by Oliver Melison and Eric Dubus. In this set collection and bartering game, players are museum curators trying to build the “biggest and most coherent” collection for their museum.

It’s scheduled to be released at Gencon 2018.

Let’s all welcome this new addition to the boardgame field.

 

 

If you’re interested in history, set-collection, captivating artwork, and a unique hand-management experience, you may want to check out Museum – now seeking funding on Kickstarter. Designed by Olivier Melison and Eric Dubus, Museum approaches a simple, elegant design with high production value and layers of player conflict and depth to keep choices fresh and interesting. The exceptional Vincent Dutrait has outdone himself, having illustrated over 180 beautiful artifacts from history that players will be pondering over as they curate their own museums of antiquity.  Players will be gathering artifacts from the corners of the world and being careful to choose which to display, as opponents nip at each other heels for the items in storage and public opinion can change the value of the more precious stash. As described on the campaign page:

Museum’s rules are easy to learn, making it an ideal game for families and younger players. However, it also contains some subtle nuances that more veteran gamers will be able to challenge themselves with.”

The set-collection and end game scoring of Museum are impressively simple, but it doesn’t take long to find that the real  draw of the game comes from the player interaction rather than the goal. From the start, players are drafting cards, denying options from one another, while having to be careful not to open up new opportunities inadvertently. The only cards that are safe are in a players display or in their hand, as all cards in the discard are available for purchase as well. This adds a twist to the colloquially known “rest action”, making it not just a means of pacing and collecting yourself, but it also allows you to block other players from accessing previously discarded cards. This, along with the shifting market and public information, creates a deeply tense social experience.

Museum has a carefully crafted touch to it which shows through in more ways than one – the rules (which can be found on the Kickstarter page) are very clean and concise, the graphic design is top-notch, and the amount of extra content on offer is also praise-worthy. Judging squarely on what’s presented, the hand-management reminds me of games like San Juan, having to be careful how to buy cards and with what, mixed with a simple structure and tension like the more recent Century: Spice Road. All of this makes a game that I’m certainly going to keep my eye on after this article is published. If you are also interested in Museum, be sure to check out their campaign page for all the information and announcements.