Clue

The Strong National Museum of Play, home to all things toy, has announced the nominees for the 2018 National Toy Hall of Fame. The eventual winner will shared these hallowed grounds with the like of last years Whiffle Ball, Clue, and Paper Airplanes, as well as some pretty strange winners, such as my personal favorite, the STICK (really, it won in 2008). This year’s nominees are no less eclectic, and include board games UNO, Chutes and Ladders, and Tudor’s Electronic Football – remember the vibrating football game from the 1960s? Also included are Chalk, American Girls Dolls, Fisher-Price Corn Popper, the Magic 8-Ball, Tic-Tac-Toe, Sleds, Pinball, Tickle Me Elmo, and … Masters Of The Universe! For the full list, check out the website here. Set your alarms, the new inductees will be announced on Thursday, November 8 at 10:30am.

The 2017 entries into the National Toy Hall of Fame have been announced, and Clue is the latest board board game to receive the award. The other 2017 entries include Paper Airplanes and the Wiffle Ball.

In 1943 pianist Anthony Pratt and his wife Elva Pratt developed a board game version of the fancy murder mystery parties that were popular between the two world wars. In their new game, Cluedo, players move around a board to eliminate possible locations, weapons and murderers to answer the questions of who the killer was, what room was used, and what the weapon was.

In 1947 the Pratt family was given a patent but post-war shortages of material made production impossible. Once material starting becoming readily available Waddington’s Games in London published the game as Cluedo in 1949, and Parker Brothers released Clue the same year.

From the National Toy Hall of Fame announcement:

Americans in the 1950s loved mysteries, whether encountered in Agatha Christie novels or Alfred Hitchcock films. And designers gave Clue an appropriately puzzling mansion, Boddy Manor, with many rooms in which to commit murder. The aptly-named victim, Mr. Boddy, is surrounded by the familiar, suspicious manor guests. Was it Miss Scarlet with the rope? Is Mrs. Peacock hiding the lead pipe? Does Colonel Mustard carry a revolver? And what is it with Professor Plum? With a fixed number of potential murderers, weapons, and locations, Clue offers 324 different murder scenario combinations—so the game plays differently nearly every time. Clue’s enjoyable, repeatable play ensured its success during the years since its introduction. It remains one of the 10 best-selling games.

Previous notable board games to be inducted include:

Monopoly was introduced in the inaugural class of 1998.

The Strong

The Strong, located in Rochester New York,  is an  interactive, collections-based museum devoted to the history and exploration of play. It houses the world’s largest collection of historical play material and is home to the International Center for the History of Electronic Games, the National Toy Hall of Fame, the World Video Game Hall of Fame, and the American Journal of Play. Each year new toys, including board games, are introduced into the National Toy Hall of Fame.

Here we are with another week of Kickstarters of a wide array from an election game, to a detective game, to a war game, so lets get started.  Up first, we have a card game based on an app called Cahoots, and being published by Mayday Games.  The game Cahoots is a normal trick taking game, but with a bit of a twist in that there are no follow rules and you score is based on which suit won the trick, not who won the trick.  But the question is, which suits will score for you?  That is determined by a card you receive at the start of the game and will have three of the six suits on them, and it’s these suits that will score for you.  However, you won’t be the only one scoring with those suits, so over the game you will be partnering with different people in order to score the suits on your card.  So each round you will play out a total of two cards, and whatever suit had the highest total value will be the winner and be scored that round.  After that you will choose some cards to keep, and some cards to remove from the game, shrinking the available card pool.  Once all the cards are out of the game, whoever has the most points is the winner.  So if this new take on trick taking sounds interesting to you, or you are a fan of the app, check out the Kickstarter page.

Next is our war game entry, coming straight to you from the prolific war game creator DVG, this time as an air dog-fighting card game called Down in Flames: Locked On.  In this game you will be flying one, two, or three of dozens of different aircraft of the recent age like the F-15C Eagle or the Sea Harrier FRS1.  You will be taking these into battle trying to shoot down the opposing player’s planes through clever use of your missiles.  At the heart of this game are the action cards, each with multiple uses from special abilities, to maneuvering, to attacking, and even countering your enemy’s attack.  When you attack you will play your card, if your opponent counters with a card you then have the opportunity to counter that card, continuing like this until the final card is played.  If you managed to play the final card your attack succeeds, if your opponent, then the attack is canceled.  When an attack is successful you will then draw cards based on what you fired to then carry out another attack sequence with those cards.  If you succeed there, you have destroyed the enemy craft, and if they are all destroyed you win the game!  So if a fast playing, dog-fighting style card game with a healthy dose of real life accuracy is your kind of thing, then check out this Kickstarter today.

Next we have a new detective game from Van Ryder Games called Detective: City of Angels.  This game I think is best described as Clue on steroids, with the main difference is that this game is more complex and is done as a one versus all style game.  One person is The Chisel, whose sole job is to lead the detectives astray and keep the case from ever being solved.  The detectives will be moving around the board, investigating locations and questioning suspects.  But here is where it gets tricky, The Chisel will be choosing the responses that he gives from those being question, and he can even outright lie to you.  However, if you challenge him on his bluff you can get the truth, revealing much needed information to solve your case, but challenge on a truth and he gets leverage over you to use against you later.  You can also bribe a snitch to be able to listen in on this info so even if you aren’t there, you can get some critical info to help you solve your case.  Strong arm some suspects, get to the truth, and solve the case before the trail goes cold and you can win the game.  You can find out more on the Kickstarter page.

After that is the unusual game of the article, and that is Electioneer, the Hong Kong election board game from Nightdreamer.  This game aims to do with the Hong Kong election system what Die Macher did for the German election system, and that is create a great game out of it.  This is an area control and resource management type game where you will be going around the various towns and cities trying to secure the most votes.  One way to get votes is through strategy cards, which show a number of territories that have some connection to them, like hitting the 12 different districts that are home to higher education institutions to get the college vote.  You will also get votes for holding the most influence in different zones on the board, as well as for holding the second most influence.  Basically there are a lot of ways to get votes, and this game shows it’s designer’s researching ability because all of these ways to get votes are methods used in actual Hong Kong elections.  Will you be able to manage your money well and get enough votes to be elected?  Check out the Kickstarter page for more information.

And last but not least, we have a reprint and revamp of a previously Kickstarted game, and that is Endure the Stars from Grimlord Games.  This 1.5 version will not only allow new players to be able to acquire this game and it’s many extras, but also improve the game for those who already own it.  Endure the Stars itself is a survival horror type game where you are passengers on a colonization ship a year into it’s long journey.  However, unauthorized experiments have been conducted to try and engineer a new life-form to explore new planets, but those experiments were discovered and the lifeforms got out, killing everyone in their path.  Now people are living in small groups scavenging to survive, and it’s up to your group to try and root out these creatures before they kill you all.  Fight back with all sorts of different weapons and ammo, and try to maintain your sanity as you play through the campaign to defeat this evil.  So if a sci-fi dungeon crawl game sounds interesting, or if you own the first edition, check out the Kickstarter page today.

USAopoly is continuing their magic streak this year at GenCon. First off is an entry into the magical world of Disney with this version of Codenames, specifically Codnames: Disney Family Version which was being demo’d in their booth. Codenames was a *huge* 2015 hit from designer Vlaada Chvátil. Codenames: Disney Family Edition keeps the Codenames gameplay, while featuring characters and locations from a variety of Disney and Pixar films, with words on one side of the cards and images on the other. As mentioned the game is only being demo’d at the booth and will be available for purchase soon.

Continuing with their magical flare, USAopoly extended their winning streak with the release of the expansion to Harry Potter: Hogwarts Battle  namely the Monster Box of Monsters Expansion. Before mentioning a single thing about the booth, however, it’s important to note that their demo area was, again, doused in theme with music playing and smoke brewing.

The Monster Box of Monsters expansion is just that, an expansion, and requires the base game to play.

Venture into the Forbidden Forest with The Monster Box of Monsters, the highly anticipated expansion to Harry Potter: Hogwarts Battle Play as Harry, Hermione, Ron, Neville or Luna Lovegood as you face frightening creatures and challenging encounters. Beware of any wrongdoing that might earn you detention! Only working together to defeat the evil forces and protecting iconic locations will make the Wizarding World safe once and for all!

Luna Lovegood is now a playable character and can be used in the base game as well

Much like the base game, there is much to be discovered on your own in this game and I don’t want to spoil a thing. Pictured above is a small representation of some of the cards that will be featured. You’ll have to deal with adding “junk” to your deck which will require spells to remove.

Moving right along is Super Mario Bros the Power Up Card Game. In Power Up, players receive, every round, a secret level card at random, with these cards being numbered 1-12. After looking at their card, each player in order can swap their card with the one held by their right-hand neighbor. Will you get something better? Maybe! If someone has a castle card, they’re immune from trade or disasters this round. After everyone has traded or passed, players can play “? Block” power-ups to affect their strength or others. Whoever has the lowest score in a round loses one of their life tokens, and if you lose all four life, you’re out of the game! Both Power Up and Harry Potter are available for purchase at the USAopoly booth.

And if that wasn’t magical enough for you, there’s always Golden Girls…..

USAopoly is can be found in booth 149.

 

 

The award-winning murder mystery board game Mysterium has been released for the iOS platform.  In this cooperative board game, one player takes on the role of the ghost of a murder victim who uses various types of cards to give clues to the other players (paranormal psychics) who will use those clues to ultimately solve the mystery of the murder.

The iOS digital version of the game features online multiplayer for up to 7 players and works cross-platform between the iOS, Android, and Steam versions. There is a solitaire and story mode as well.

Toucharcade.com has written an informative article with more information on this release.  You can read it in full here.

risk-star-wars

Hasbro has had some fairly big success with recent Star Wars-themed re-implementations of popular board games. Star Wars Risk is one of their latest examples.

Well, this time Hasbro appears to have, once again, outdone itself with a re-scheming/re-implementation of Star Wars Clue!

But the biggest twist you’ll find in this version of the game is that no one actually dies. Instead of solving a murder by figuring out who the killer was, what weapon they used, and where they committed the crime, Clue: Star Wars Edition ($25) has players trying to escape the moon-sized space station with a copy of the Death Star’s plans. (i09)

You can read more about it over at Hasbro’s site here.

strong_building1

The nominees for induction into The Strong’s National Toy Hall of Fame were released, and 3 iconic board games (4 depending on which side you are on) made the cut.  They are as follows:

  • Bubble Wrap. Created by accident in 1957 by two engineers who were attempting to develop a new kind of wallpaper.  (given that a previous winner was blankets, this makes sense)
  • Care Bears. Began as a line of greeting cards in the early 1980s but evolved into a brand whose bears star in storybooks, television shows and games.
  • Coloring Book. New York printer McLoughlin Brothers is credited with inventing the books that have enjoyed renewed popularity lately thanks to adult-oriented versions featuring complex designs.
  • Clue. The game that invites players to solve a murder remains a best-seller nearly 70 years after its release.
  • Dungeons & Dragons. The 1970s role-playing game featuring imaginary worlds of magic and monsters influenced today’s computer game industry.
  • Fisher-Price Little People. A wooden version first rode the Safety School Bus in 1959. The brightly painted figures were given arms and legs in the 1990s.
  • Nerf. The foam balls safe enough to throw indoors were first produced in the 1960s.
  • Pinball. The machines have long been a mainstay at bars, amusement parks and arcades, with players using flippers to launch steel balls through mazes.
  • Rock ‘Em Sock ‘Em Robots. Competitors throw mechanical punches in an effort to knock the block off of their opponent’s boxer.
  • Swing. Found in ancient cave drawings in Europe and ceramic vases from Greece — and in playgrounds and backyards everywhere.
  • Transformers. Hasbro’s shape-changing action figures are featured in comic books, games, breakfast cereal and movies, the latest of which is due out in June.
  • Uno. The 1971 game where players dispose of the cards in their hands has sold steadily for more than four decades.

Two out of these 12 nominees will be inducted into the Hall of Fame on November 10th and reside alongside toys like the Legos, Barbie, and Chess.  You can see the list and previous winners on the Hall of Fame website.

monopoly

Business Insider published an article this week announcing a new movie in the works…and with this title for the article:

If you weren’t convinced Hollywood has run out of ideas — here’s your proof.

It appears that Hasbro and Lionsgate are joining forces to bring to captivated audiences everywhere the latest film based on a board game intellectual property–arguably, THE board game IP.

In summary, here is the plot of the Monopoly Movie:

The story centers on a boy from Baltic Avenue who uses both Chance and Community in a quest to make his fortune, taking him on a fun, adventure-filled journey. It’s about making your own luck, what makes you truly rich and, of course, avoiding Jail time!

The movie concept has been discussed since 2008, and now it appears that Andrew Niccol (“The Truman Show”) will be handling the screenplay.  No release date has yet been announced for the film.

It could be hoped that if we are to have a movie based on the famous Monopoly board game, they can deliver a cinematic delight at least on par with the classic “Clue” movie.

We shall see.

For the official press release, click here.

clue to die for

Perhaps the most well-known and successful movie about a board game was Clue (1985), a movie by Jonathan Lynn in which the houseguests and house staff work together to solve a mystery.  This year celebrates the movie’s 30th anniversary, and Gallery 1988 brings an entire collection of original collectible artwork for fans.  This collection includes prints, 3D wall pieces, and sculptures.

An announcement was made about this new collection here on slashfilm.com, or you can view the prints on the official Gallery 1988 website.

clue live

Cult movie “Clue” – based on the classic family board game of the same name – apparently has quite a following in New York City and the good folks at the Williamsburg based bar/cinema Videology are out to prove it.

“The film has long been fan-favorite at Videology, which regularly hosts screenings where the audience can play the titular board games while they watch. Film fanatics always pack those nights out, said a Videology staffer.”

Now, Videology is hosting a new form of screening with the help of director Peter Smith and his cohort of Clue loving comedians. With the screening room transformed into the film’s infamous study, the performers will take the stage every time the story returns to that room and perform the scene live. According to Smith, “The cast won’t steer too far from the original script, despite their pedigree as improv performers, because you can’t improve on perfection.”

The screening will take place at 9:30 on May 30. For more information on Videology – and the required entry fee – check out the full article here.