card game

Out this month is the card game version of the game Amun-Re from Super Meeple.

This Egyptian themed three-round card game has three auctions each round, other actions and then scoring. Players take turns bidding on Provinces by placing money cards next to province cards. Outbid players take back their cards and after three rounds of auctions, players make an offering of gold. The Nile will flood according to the sum of the offering, which will in turn determine how much money players will get from the fields on their provinces.

Players can spend money to build pyramids on their provinces, and score points for pyramids, amount of fields and for having ankhs (which can also be on the province cards.)

Second and third rounds play similarly, except the new provinces bury the old ones, except for the pyramids. Scoring happens at the end of each round and the player with the most points win.

Watch the Dice Tower’s review of the game here.

Txarli Factory, a miniatures and game company based in Pamplano, Spain, has launched a new game on Kickstarter called Rising for the Throne. The card and dice game is fantasy-based with dragons, gryphons, and knights depicted, to name just a few. There is an overall Norse mythology-vibe to the cards and they have a watercolor look to them while also coming off as gritty and grounded.

Most of the information about gameplay can be found in the link to the manual while the video gives some insight into the theme and story.

In this land, the six great clans are relentlessly recruiting new warriors for their battles—Choose your clan, collect resources, recruit new troops, and get the victory. Only one clan can win and sit on the great throne of the kingdom.

The collector’s edition comes with chunky, nicely sculpted figureheads for each of the six clans. Check out the video and images of Rising for the Throne over on Kickstarter.

 

The Networks is a set collection game for 1 to 5 players that plays in 60 – 90 minutes by Gil Hova with art by Heiko Günther and Travis Kinchy. Each player is trying to collect the Stars and Ads pneeded to get Shows. Ads produce the most money when placed in the proper time slot and Stars will give their best performance when they have the perfect conditions. As Shows age, they’ll lose viewers (points at end game) so the player will need to manage their line-up, canceling older shows and sending them to re-runs to make room for the newest shows. The player with the most points at the end of five seasons is the winner.

The Networks: Telly Time expansion features nine genres, three of which are new: Chat Shows, Quiz Shows, and Kids Shows. Chat Shows grant a special power upon Development that allows the player to rotate all of the Stars and Ads in one of their time slots to their good sides. The Quiz Shows grant a bonus at the end of each season, letting the player exchange up to 3 viewers for $1M each. Kids Shows have no special power but can get the player a lot of viewers for a low cost and can be stuffed with Ads. The expansion also introduces a new “noughts-and-crosses” way to get genre bonuses. All together, this expansion provides 59 cards and 35 plastic chips in a tuck box. This expansion does require the base game to play and is fully compatible with The Networks: Executives expansion but is only partially compatible with The Networks: On the Air expansion.

To see the preview of The Networks: Telly Time and The Networks: Executives, watch the video from GAMA here. You can see a review of the base game here.

Witless Wizards is a 15 minute game for 2 to 4 players, perfect as a gateway game or a quick filler. Old and forgetful wizards battle it out to be the last wizard standing.

At the start of the game, the players will collectively choose three decks to use in their game. These decks get shuffled together and become the common deck that all players will draw from. On your turn, you draw one card and decide whether to equip it yourself or give it to your opponent to equip on their wizard. If you choose to equip it yourself, the next card you draw must be given to your opponent – even if it is better than the one you equipped. You can also discard a Concentration Gem to draw two cards before choosing which one you give your opponent (the other gets discarded). After you have equipped yourself and your opponent, you attack. An attack is performed by subtracting your opponent’s defense from your attack value plus your rolled magic die. Last wizard standing wins.

Three variants are included for more than two players, to include free-for-all, 2 vs 2 teams, and a structured competitive mode. Read more about this quick and humorous game on its campaign page.

Plaid Hat Games announces two new clans coming to Crystal Clans: the Fire Clan and Light Clan. The Fire Clan will have a Consume ability that puts a timer on many of your  squads, burning through them to keep the heat on your opponent. The Light Clan uses their unique Prayer ability to turn their units into initiative or even transform them into powerful Avatar heroes.

These two clans are joining the six currently in the base game, as well as the other four that are currently getting previews: Shadow, Fang, Feather, and Leaf Clans. Read more on the Shadow and Fang Clans here. Check here to read more on the upcoming Fire and Light Clans.

Renowned artist Kwanchai Moriya (known for Catacombs and Dinosaur Island) has teamed up with designer Conor McGoey (known for Summit: The Board Game) to produce the goriest, trick-taking, card game of Gladiatorial Combat to hit Kickstarter. Gorus Maximus is produced by Inside Up Games, the game plays for 20-45 minutes and supports 2-8 players, aged 13+.

Players create a deck specific to the number of players then each player is dealt 10 cards to form their Troupe. The first card of the round sets the Preferred School, while the first card of the bout sets the Initiating School. Going clockwise, each player contributes 1 gladiator to the bout following the Initiating School, or a gladiator matching the rank of the last gladiator player which changes trump immediately. The strongest Preferred Gladiator wins, otherwise the strongest Initiating Gladiator wins. The winner of the bout leads the next bout setting the Initiating School, while the Preferred School continues between bouts. Cards won contribute to the Crowd Favor which is calculated after 10 bouts of play, with the winner receiving 1 Crowd Support. The first player to reach 3 Crowd Support wins.

There are also 2-player and team-play variants of the game.

Gorus Maximus requires a base pledge of $15 (excluding shipping) for the game but you can opt for a premium edition for $20. The Kickstarter campaign is running until Wednesday, July 11th, 2018 with expected delivery in October 2018.

Jellybean Games is running a Kickstarter campaign for Hidden Panda, the latest game from designer Peter C. Hayward (known for The Lady and the Tiger), and with art by Kellie Jo (known for Ninjitsu!). Hidden Panda is a family-friendly, social deduction game for 5-8 players, aged 8+, which plays in 20-30 minutes.

Players take on one of 4 roles as part of two teams. They can be a panda who is hiding from the bandits and trying to get back their babies. Other players can be the bandits who are trying to steal the babies. A single player can also be the keeper, who protects the pandas and subtly lets them know that they’re there to help. Grandma, who is also played by a single player, is there to lead the team, help the pandas, and distract the bandits. Each turn, players try to hand baby pandas to their teammates without giving away their role.

While Grandma and the Keeper are trying to help the hidden pandas, the bandits are trying to capture the hidden pandas in nets. The game has no player elimination as all players keep playing even when they’re netted in a vote (which prevents them collecting baby pandas but allows them to keep voting to help their team). The simple roles, straightforward win condition, cute theme, and short play time should make this game very appealing to younger players.

The Kickstarter campaign includes exclusive wooden, baby panda tokens and allows you to add-on prior games released by Jellybean Games. A base pledge of $23 (excluding shipping, which is only to certain countries) nets you Hidden Panda along with all it’s stretch goals. The campaign is running until Friday, July 6th, 2018, and is expected to ship June 2019.

 

Fans of deck-building and dungeon-delving will be delighted to hear that Alderac Entertainment Group will be launching the second Kickstarter for their celebrated game, Thunderstone Quest, on July 17th at 9:00 am PST.  Pursuing their goal of transitioning to traditional brick and mortar stores,  TQ will also be making its way into retail outlets in the fourth quarter of 2018.

New to this Kickstarter will be:

  • Both solo and co-op rules (which will also be available on print-and-play)
  • A 6th quest
  • An add-on for more than 4 players
  • A new (second) storage solution, as the old Champion box, massive as it was, “is effectively full if you sleeve and have Epic”.

Backers can purchase everything offered the first time around.  The base game or the Champion level rewards (identical to the 1st Kickstarter) will both be available,  or they can back for the new content only. Those who backed the Adventurer level the first time can get an add-on pack, giving them the content from the Champion level. The Champion level will feature the same 5 quests as before and Kickstarter will be the only place that someone can obtain the 2nd quest, Total Eclipse of the Sun.  The retail version will not contain this quest.

The solo and co-op rules system will be bundled together with the 6th quest, What Lies Beneath, as a single add-on.  Solo and c0-op will both use the same set of cards as the base game.  The new solo and co-op rules will also be available in print-and-play, so it will be interesting to see what extras this add-on will have.

Regarding the new solo and co-op system, AEG stated,

The Thunderstone community also strongly communicated that they wanted a Solo & Co-Op experience for the game. Our design team has been working on a game experience that is way beyond just a simple set of rules and represents an entirely new way to experience Thunderstone. We think it is AWESOME!

Delivery for all backer levels is scheduled for “no later than April 2019“.

Timelines for retail releases:

Q4 2018:

  • Core starter set, which, along with basic components, will contain Quest 1, Mirror in the Dark and Quest 3, Rise From the Mire
  • Quest 4, At the Foundations of the World

Early 2019:

  • Quest 5, Ripples in Time

Second Half of 2019:

  • Quest 6, What Lies Beneath

Lastly, retailers joining the Kick It Here program can back the Champion Reward and the Solo/Co-op system with Quest 6 and have it before the regular retail release.

To see reviews and a playthrough of TQ, click here.  For more TQ information and updates prior to the Kickstarter, click here.

 

 

Pandasaurus Games has announced three new games coming out in August: Qwinto, The Mind, and Nyctophobia.

Qwinto, by Bernhard Lach and Uwe Rapp, is a roll and write game for two to six players and takes 15 minutes to play. In Qwinto, all players play simultaneously. Each player has a score sheet with three rows in three different colors (orange, yellow, and purple) and there are three dice (one of each color). Each row will contain mostly circle fields with a few pentagonal fields. The active player rolls one to three dice (their choice) and each player will choose whether to add the rolled sum to one available field on their score sheet. There are only three rules for writing sums on the score sheet:

  1. The chosen row must be the same color as one of the rolled dice.
  2. The numbers in the row must increase from left to right (leaving blank spaces is allowed)
  3. No duplicate numbers may appear in a single column.

Any player may choose not to write a sum on their score sheet without penalty unless they are the active player; the active player must mark one of the miss-throw fields if they choose not to add the rolled sum to their sheet. The game ends when a player has filled two rows on their score sheet or when any player has filled in their fourth miss-throw field. Players then score points equal to the number in the pentagonal field for each completed column, points equal to the right-most number in each completed row, and one point for each number in each incomplete row. Each miss-throw is negative five points. The player with the most points wins! For more information, check out The Dice Tower reviews here.

The Mind, by Wolfgang Warsch, is a team experience for two to four players. Players are attempting to complete levels by placing their cards collectively in ascending order, but here’s the catch – the players are not allowed to communicate in any way to indicate what cards they have. The game includes numbered cards 1 -100, level cards 1 -12, life cards, and shuriken cards. Players will try to complete 12/10/8 levels for 2/3/4 players. For each level, the players will be dealt a number of cards equal to the level number (1 card for level 1, 2 cards for level 2, etc.) that are kept hidden from the other players. Then, all players will try to place their cards one by one on the discard pile face up in ascending order, not knowing what cards are in the other players’ hands. If a card is placed that is higher than one still in a player’s hand, that player will call a stop, the players will lose a life, and then the level will continue. The players also have shuriken cards, that can help them make it through a level. As long as all of the players agree, a shuriken card can be used to allow all players to discard their lowest level card, which then becomes public knowledge. The game ends when the players have successfully completed all of the levels or if the players lose their last life. For more information, check out The Dice Tower reviews here.

Nyctophobia, by Catherine Stippell, is a cooperative horror-survival game for three to five players that plays in 30 – 45 minutes. Up to four players will play as the Hunted and a single player will be the Hunter. The goal of the Hunted is to make it through the forest maze to their car and survive. The Hunter will win if any of the Hunted die. Sounds fairly simple, right? Here’s the hard part – all of the Hunted players wear black out glasses so they cannot see the board and can only navigate by touch.

At the beginning of the game, the Hunter (the only player who can see the board) will set up the board based on the scenario (axe murderer or mage) and give the players the general direction of their car (north, south, west, or east), but the Hunted don’t know where they are starting in relation to the car. On the Hunted player’s turn, the Hunter will assist the Hunted by placing their hand on their player piece. Then, they can explore the surrounding spaces next to their player piece. After exploring, they’ll decide on a direction to move. This may cause them to pick up rocks that they can later throw to distract the Hunter, bump into another Hunted player allowing them to coordinate and better determine their location in the forest, or run into the Hunter, taking damage. Each Hunted only has two health. The Hunter uses a deck of cards to determine their movement on their turn, but has certain rules they must follow, such as heading towards any noise markers (from thrown rocks) on the board.

There are two versions of the Hunter: the axe murderer and the mage. The ax murderer can chop down trees to get to the Hunted faster while the mage can manipulate the forest, moving trees and rotating the entire map, to confuse the players. To see more, check out the GAMA 2018 video here.

Due to the upcoming expiration of their current licensing term, Fantasy Flight Games has announced that starting October 22, 2018, they will no longer offer any Android: Netrunner The Card Game products for sale, including playmats and card sleeves.

However, before the end, there is one more expansion being released: Reign and Reverie deluxe expansion. This expansion will include cards for every faction and celebrates all things Android: Netrunner. With the end of Android: Netrunner The Card Game, Organized Play will also be drawing to a close and more information for Organized Play and the final Android: Netrunner World Championship can be found here.

Fantasy Flight Games launched Android: Netrunner The Card Game in 2012 and has given players a total of two core sets, a campaign expansion, five deluxe expansions, and eight cycles of Data Packs. Not all is lost for the worlds of Android, as Fantasy Flight Games stated that those worlds will continue to be explored in future products. To read more, including thoughts from Lead Developer Michael Boggs and Head of Studio Andrew Navaro, click here.