Tim Tylinski

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Tim is an electrical engineer in the aviation industry. He lives in the greater Cincinnati, Ohio area with his wife, son and dog. He buys more games every year than he plays.

Last year Shem Phillips and co-designer Sam Macdonald released Architects of the West Kingdom, the first game in a new series.  Now the designers are back with the second installment in the series, Paladins of the West Kingdom.  Architects had players building a town and its cathedral, while Paladins has players spreading the faith and defending the town from outsiders.

In Paladins of the West Kingdom, each player has a set of 12 paladin cards which provide workers, temporary attribute bonuses and a special ability for the round.  The players draw three paladin cards at the start of each round, select one to use, return one to the top of the deck and the other to the bottom.  Each player also has a personal board which is used to gather resources, increase attributes and score points.  Players take turns using their workers to perform a variety of actions, like recruit townsfolk, fortify the town, commission new monks, and attack or convert outsiders.  Some features from Architects (e.g. debt cards) return in Paladins; however, several new features are introduced, like suspicion cards which could lead to penalties from the Inquisition.

Like Architects and Raiders of the North Sea, Paladins features artwork from The Mico. Paladins is for 1 to 4 players.  There are a couple of different pledge levels, as well as, some additional promo cards included for both Paladins and Architects.  You can find out more about the game on its Kickstarter page.

Capstone Games is partnering with Winsome Games on a new line of games they are calling the Iron Rails series.

“The Iron Rail series from Capstone Games features games centered around investing in and building railroad networks with a focus on a specific geographic region in the world. Player interaction, route building, and stock investments are key features of the Iron Rail series.”

The first release in the Iron Rails series will be Winsome’s 2014 game, Irish Gauge. The Capstone release of Irish Gauge will maintain the original game play, but with a completely updated look featuring the artwork and graphic design of Ian O’Toole.

Irish Gauge supports 3 to 5 players, with a play time of about 60 minutes. Irish Gauge is expected to be released in the third quarter of this year. You can learn more about the game on its BGG page.

WizKids has announced a licensing deal to bring the sci-fi television series, The Orville, to their HeroClix line of games. The initial game content will include the primary crew members of the show, and is due out later this year.

” The first product to release will be a Jumbo Starter Set featuring the main crew, including Captain Ed Mercer, played by actor Seth MacFarlane, along with Commander Kelly Grayson, Dr. Claire Finn, Lt. Alara Kitan, Lt. Gordon Malloy, Lt. Commander Bortus, Lt. Commander John LaMarr, enabling HeroClix players and fans to embark in interstellar combat with their favorite characters. “

There were not many additional details provided in the press release, but you can read the full announcement here.

If I told you there was another social/party game on Kickstarter, you might not be too excited.  But, what if I told you the game was co-designed by award-winning designer, Wolfgang Warsch?  Designers Wolfgang Warsch (The Mind, Illusion and The Quacks of Quedlinburg), Alex Hague and Justin Vickers have teamed up on a new game called, Wavelength.

Wavelength is a team based guessing game, whereby, a hidden target is established between two points.  One member of the team is trying to get the other players to guess where the target, or bullseye, is located.  They do this by drawing a card which presents opposites end of a spectrum, for instance, hot and cold or rough and smooth.  A clue is given in attempt to relate the location of the bullseye within that spectrum.  Players then discuss how they think that clue relates to the position of the target between those extremes, while the opposing team can “suggest” how they think the clue relates in an effort to make them second guess themselves.  The active team then turns a dial (7.5″ rotating wheel) to select a spot on the spectrum.  Varying points are awarded based on how close they are to the target.

“One of the really unique things about Wavelength is that it’s played entirely IN THE BOX. The cards, dial, and score tracker all slot into the box’s tray, and you just…pass it around.”

The Kickstarter campaign for Wavelength has a single pledge level of $29 for a copy of the game.  The campaign is being run by Alex Hague, who has completed several successful campaigns for the game, Monikers.


In 2017, when Plan B Games released Century: Spice Road, it was presented as the first game in a planned series.  In 2018 the second game of the series, Century: Eastern Wonders, was released.  Now, Plan B Games and designer Emerson Matsuuchi have announced the third and final game in the series, Century: A New World.

“Players serve as merchants seeking fortune in the bountiful American continent. Only the most shrewd merchants will strike out to explore the foreign land, trade with local inhabitants, journal their findings, and hunt and gather to survive.”

Each game in the series has been set in a different time period and region of the world, and has featured the core mechanic of resource management and trading.  Spice Road was based around card selection and hand management.  Eastern Wonders introduced a modular board and pick-up and deliver to the series.  Now, A New World will use worker placement and is set in 16th century North America.  A New World can be played by itself, or mixed and matched with the other two games in the series.

Century: A New World is designed for 2 to 4 players and is planned to debut at Origins Game Fair later this year.

Eggertspiele has announced Era: Medieval Age, a new game from designer Matt Leacock.  Not only is Era being pitched as a spiritual successor to Roll Through the Ages, but also, the first roll-and-build game.

In Era, players will be using three-dimensional pieces (churches, farms, mills, castle walls, etc.) to build up medieval towns on their personal boards.  The dice represent different classes of medieval society.

“Era: Medieval Age is made even more challenging as players interact with each other in ways such as extortion, scorched earth, and, of course, disease!”

The other piece of the announcement is that Era: Medieval Age marks the start of a series of roll-and-build games from Matt Leacock and Eggertspiele.  No specifics were provided about other games, but Era is planned to debut at Gen Con later this year.

Era: Medieval Age is designed for 1 to 4 players, ages 12 and up.

In 2018, Plan B Games created the Next Move Games brand for the purpose of designing and publishing lighter abstract strategy games.  Next Move Games already has the immensely popular Azul, as well as, Reef.  Now they have announced their next game, Tuki.

In Tuki, players will attempt to create inukshuk (stone landmarks created by the Inuit people) using 3D blocks.  Cards depict different abstract inukshuk structures and each card has a symbol with a corresponding die face.  Players will use the limited block pieces available to them to construct the inukshuk based on the die roll.

“The challenging part is the limited pieces players have to construct the inukshuk with. Players must be creative and use the three-dimensional pieces in multiple ways, such as to counterbalance other pieces or, even build on top of existing pieces.  There should be no limit to your creativity and imagination, but there will always be a solution!”

Tuki appears to maintain the Next Move Games brand promise of quality tactile components.  Tuki is designed for two to four players, ages 8 and up, and is expected to be released at Origins Game Fair later this year.

 

WizKids has announced Kibble Scuffle, a cat themed card game for 2 to 4 players.  In Kibble Scuffle, each player receives a deck of cards comprised of different types of cats (think tom cat or fat cat, not calico or Siamese).  On their turn, a player will play one of the cat cards from their hand to one of three food bowl locations on the table.  Each cat type has a different attribute which manipulates how the card interacts with other cards, location around food bowls or how much food they receive when it is time to eat.  At any point there are five or more cats at a given food bowl, the placement of cats is paused and the food at that bowl is distributed to cats based on turn order and attributes of the cats at the given location.  Food cubes placed in the bowl location during the game are drawn from the box and vary in point value based on color.

There are also some items cards in each player’s deck which can be used as one-time effects.  The game’s rule book also lists a few gameplay variants.  No specific release date for Kibble Scuffle was given, only that it is “coming soon.”  You can learn more about the game on the publisher’s product page, or read the announcement here.

Did you know that roll-and-write games were invented in the 4th century BCE?  Okay, maybe not.  But, Days of Wonder and designer Sébastien Pauchon (Jaipur, Jamaica) are publishing, Corinth, a roll-and-write game with a theme set in the 4th century BCE.

In Corinth, the players are traders using the dice to acquire resources and deliver goods to the market.  The active player rolls nine dice, then the dice are grouped according to value and assigned to different levels of the common harbor board which depicts the various actions.  Additionally, the active player can spend gold to roll additional dice that only they can use.  The current active player gets first choice of which group of dice to take and then mark the corresponding action on their personal sheet.  Subsequent players get to choose from the remaining dice pool.   The number of dice the player takes from a given action location on the harbor board dictates the number of resources they acquire, or goods they deliver to a given location.  In lieu of delivering goods to a particular market, the player can choose to take the value of the dice at a give location and move a steward along a path around the market (represented by lines on a grid) in order to gain resources, goods or additional bonuses.  At the end of their turn, the player may spend gold to construct a building, which can provide additional bonuses to future actions or end of game scoring.

Corinth appears to have a little more player interaction than the typical roll-and-write game, since players may want to take dice from a given location in order to prevent other players from completing spots/bonuses on their boards.  Corinth has an estimated play time of 20-30 minutes, and is for 2 to 4 players, ages 8 and up.

The game is due to be released in March for Europe and May for North America.  You can read the full press release from Days of Wonder here, or visit the publisher product page here.

In 2018, Luxor, designed by Rüdiger Dorn, received a Spiel des Jahres nomination.  Considering that a Spiel des Jahres nomination generally leads to good sales, it only makes sense that Queen Games would release more content to support the game.  Luxor: The Mummy’s Curse expansion is now on Kickstarter.

Luxor: The Mummy’s Curse includes components for a fifth player, as well as, four different content modules.  Two of the modules are comprised of new equipment cards and treasure tiles.  The “mummy module,” which includes a mummy standee, 20 talisman tokens and 18 mummy tiles, introduces a mummy that players may move around the board to curse other players in order to collect talisman tokens, which can be spent on reward tiles.  The “special adventurers” module brings variable player powers.

The Kickstarter campaign for The Mummy’s Curse includes pledge levels for the expansion, as well as, a bundle with the base game.  Price tiers and full content details can be found on the Kickstarter campaign page.