Myk

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Beyond loving friends and family, I love me some board games, video games, pinball, comics, and anime. Living in Aurora, Illinois, but prone to wander seemingly anywhere.

Chiyo’s Secret is an upcoming game from designer J.B. Howell and published by WizKids. Checking a distributor’s page and its BGG listing have given me some reasons for excitement for Chiyo’s Secret. What peeked my interest in this hidden role game is that its BGG summation brought out feelings of recent classic games like Coup and Love Letter:

“You are a noble ally of the daimyo, perhaps with a secret agenda of your own… Chiyo’s Secret has four teams: Loyal Allies, who seek to capture Chiyo and Fusanobu and send them to be executed for their crimes; Usurpers, who seek to lure Fusanobu and the Daimyo into a trap and seize power for themselves; Betrayers, who seek to betray the Daimyo and present Chiyo and Fusanobu to the Shogun instead; and the lone Motonaka who seeks to protect his parents, hiding them until the Shogun arrives.”

If this intrigues you as well you can already learn the backstory and how to play this 5-8 player, 45-60 minute game as the final rules are already posted and show off the art and components as well.

J.B. Howell may not be a famous board game designer yet, but 2019 may change that, with two other WizKids games scheduled to release, as well as at least three from other publishers. One of which, Reavers of Midgard by Grey Fox Games, the newest game in their Champions of Midgard universe, may be cause for some series fans to check out Chiyo’s Secret to examine Howell’s design skills. I am equally interested in another 2019 release of Howell’s called Papillon, which combines butterflies and flowers in a game of set collection, tile placement, and area control/area influence into a unique looking package.

Gamers  will starter to gather information and seek out others to complete their objectives in January 2019 when Chiyo’s Secret is scheduled to release.

Upon hearing of the announcement of the title This Game Goes to Eleven, likely many fans like myself  of the film This Is Spinal Tap (1984) expected to see a licensed IP game from the film, similar to the more than five games out in the last five years from The Princess Bride (1987). Alas, this is not the case, and instead the game is loosely based on the general idea from the film’s iconic joke. But before you write the game off completely, it is being published by Gamewright, who have had several notable and successful games in the past with hits like Sushi Go Party and Forbidden Desert.

This family-weight game features 72 cards and a guitar pick, and allows 2-6 players (ages 8+) to have rocking time adding cards to the center pile to 11 in a quick 15-20 minute play session.

This Game Goes to Eleven had its sneak peek at GenCon 2018, and is out in the US as a Target store exclusive, similar to recent titles such as Megaland and Ticket to Ride: New York. More info on This Game Goes to Eleven can be found at Gamewright’s website.

Hopefully this games lives up to the classic joke from character Nigel Tufnel, and BoardGameGeek ratings will have to follow IMDB’s rating scale for the movie This Is Spinal Tap and will have to max out at 11 when the page is created.

Nintendo Switch is not currently a haven for playing modern board games, with available options topping out with titles like Othello and Monopoly. Yet, the hybridization of being able to play both at home and on the go with a Nintendo Switch could be a game changer with the right titles…

Enter Carcassonne – Asmodee Digital announced that it will be bring the fan-favorite Klaus-Jürgen Wrede game Carcassonne to the Switch platform during the winter quarter of this year, and while Carcassonne is already available digitally, the Switch platform has advantages that many gamers will find appealing over a phone app or Steam-based computer game. For one thing, the Switch screen is much bigger than an average cell phone, and physical Switch physical games are easy to trade or share. Also, players on the whole are more likely to play local couch co-op on a TV screen via a console, rather than on PC.

For those unfamiliar with the game from 2000 that started all of this excitement, check out its BGG page, but here is the quickest summation: Carcassonne is an easy to play, hard to master tile-laying game for 2-5  players in which over the course of 30 minutes or so you will be making decisions on to best control and influence the outcomes of different areas of tiles. Placing on the road as a robber, or cloistered away as a monk are two of the roles players can assign their people (called meeples) to in order to score the most points across the southern France landscape and claim victory!

But the Nintendo Switch and designer board game pairing likely does not start and end with Carcassonne…

quoting Pierre Ortolan, CEO of Asmodee Digital,

“Carcassonne is the first Asmodee Digital title of many to follow on Nintendo’s platforms.” 

Thus leading one to believe that Asmodee Digital would likely bring over the other titles that have already been crafted digitally on other platforms, such as: fellow gateway game Ticket to Ride, award-winning Terraforming Mars, and recent mega-hit Scythe. With these titles stemming from a single developer, it would already be a solid foothold for modern board games on a current generation video game console, and it would be easy to envision makers of other digital board game implementations also porting over their creations, such as: Alhambra, Kingdom Builder, Splendor, or Small World.

As a fan of digital board gaming, watching the video on Paste Magazine’s article got my meeple heart beating hard to lay down some farmers for the win.

 

Army of Darkness: The Board Game is an upcoming major release from Lynnvander Studios and Dynamite Entertainment covering the cult-classic third film in the Evil Dead trilogy. While not a lot is known about the game yet, prepare for chainsaw and S-Mart jokes for 1-4 players wreaking havoc for an hour to 90 minutes, with an intended age of 10 or older.

Not to be confused with either the 1993 board game called Army of Darkness, nor the 2004 game Army of Darkness Card Game, Army of Darkness: The Board Game (2018) will bring in highly detailed miniatures and all-new boomstick battles against the Deadites! Plus, the Board Game Geek (BGG) page states that players…

“…play as Ash and his allies, and work together to fight off swarms of Deadites commanded by Evil Ash and Evil Shiela.” 

BGG also lists the game as dice rolling, co-op, and involving programmed movement, which leads to an exciting combination of game mechanisms that will need some clarification once everything is finalized to have an idea of exactly how it will all come together – but so far, sounds groovy.

Designed by the team of Josh Derksen, Thomas M. Gofton, and Aron Murch who have been published many times by Jasco Games in the past, collectively working on titles such as:  Albion’s Legacy, Cyber:Run, and another game handling a beloved intellectual property in Buffy the Vampire Slayer: The Board Game.

While no official release date has been announced, more about Army of Darkness: The Board Game can be learned from Nerdist’s article by clicking here.

Monikers: More Monikers adds to the loads of laughs of the popular game Monikers by adding 440 new cards, expanding the base game of the same card count. This newest addition to the Monikers family also includes enough room in its relatively giant box for storage of 2,000 cards in order to house the other expansions as well. The player count and game length are very flexible, but the general idea is that 4-20 players may take around an hour to play, and it is intended for players 18+ due to some mature card themes, not due to game complexity.

The game of Monikers is simple to learn and builds on several known concepts and brings them together in hilarious harmony. The overall goal is simple, whatever the card says, get your buds to guess it. But of course, it is slightly more complicated than that.

“The twist is that you play over three rounds, and each time, you have to give clues in different ways. So in the 1st round, you can say or do anything. In the 2nd, you can only use one word. And in the 3rd, you can only do charades.”

For more information on the base game of Monikers check out the Dice Tower page with helpful links by clicking here.

Party games like Monikers stay fresh with a bunch of cards to choose from, so even the same group can constantly revel in new ridiculousness. Plus, many of the cards in this newest set are extremely timely pop culture references so there is extra excitement in adding this to your Monikers lineup.

While there are numerous pledge levels for those who want to pick up additional cards, the cost for solely Monikers: More Monikers is only $25 plus shipping. Find out more about the Kickstarter campaign for Monikers: More Monikers by clicking here.