Ashley Tarnow

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Ashley spends most of her free time learning and playing new board games with her husband. She will play anything from a light family game to a heavy hitting strategy game and everything in between. She hopes one day to introduce her daughter to the wonderful world of board games.

The Networks is a set collection game for 1 to 5 players that plays in 60 – 90 minutes by Gil Hova with art by Heiko Günther and Travis Kinchy. Each player is trying to collect the Stars and Ads pneeded to get Shows. Ads produce the most money when placed in the proper time slot and Stars will give their best performance when they have the perfect conditions. As Shows age, they’ll lose viewers (points at end game) so the player will need to manage their line-up, canceling older shows and sending them to re-runs to make room for the newest shows. The player with the most points at the end of five seasons is the winner.

The Networks: Telly Time expansion features nine genres, three of which are new: Chat Shows, Quiz Shows, and Kids Shows. Chat Shows grant a special power upon Development that allows the player to rotate all of the Stars and Ads in one of their time slots to their good sides. The Quiz Shows grant a bonus at the end of each season, letting the player exchange up to 3 viewers for $1M each. Kids Shows have no special power but can get the player a lot of viewers for a low cost and can be stuffed with Ads. The expansion also introduces a new “noughts-and-crosses” way to get genre bonuses. All together, this expansion provides 59 cards and 35 plastic chips in a tuck box. This expansion does require the base game to play and is fully compatible with The Networks: Executives expansion but is only partially compatible with The Networks: On the Air expansion.

To see the preview of The Networks: Telly Time and The Networks: Executives, watch the video from GAMA here. You can see a review of the base game here.

Witless Wizards is a 15 minute game for 2 to 4 players, perfect as a gateway game or a quick filler. Old and forgetful wizards battle it out to be the last wizard standing.

At the start of the game, the players will collectively choose three decks to use in their game. These decks get shuffled together and become the common deck that all players will draw from. On your turn, you draw one card and decide whether to equip it yourself or give it to your opponent to equip on their wizard. If you choose to equip it yourself, the next card you draw must be given to your opponent – even if it is better than the one you equipped. You can also discard a Concentration Gem to draw two cards before choosing which one you give your opponent (the other gets discarded). After you have equipped yourself and your opponent, you attack. An attack is performed by subtracting your opponent’s defense from your attack value plus your rolled magic die. Last wizard standing wins.

Three variants are included for more than two players, to include free-for-all, 2 vs 2 teams, and a structured competitive mode. Read more about this quick and humorous game on its campaign page.

Plaid Hat Games announces two new clans coming to Crystal Clans: the Fire Clan and Light Clan. The Fire Clan will have a Consume ability that puts a timer on many of your  squads, burning through them to keep the heat on your opponent. The Light Clan uses their unique Prayer ability to turn their units into initiative or even transform them into powerful Avatar heroes.

These two clans are joining the six currently in the base game, as well as the other four that are currently getting previews: Shadow, Fang, Feather, and Leaf Clans. Read more on the Shadow and Fang Clans here. Check here to read more on the upcoming Fire and Light Clans.

Pandasaurus Games has announced three new games coming out in August: Qwinto, The Mind, and Nyctophobia.

Qwinto, by Bernhard Lach and Uwe Rapp, is a roll and write game for two to six players and takes 15 minutes to play. In Qwinto, all players play simultaneously. Each player has a score sheet with three rows in three different colors (orange, yellow, and purple) and there are three dice (one of each color). Each row will contain mostly circle fields with a few pentagonal fields. The active player rolls one to three dice (their choice) and each player will choose whether to add the rolled sum to one available field on their score sheet. There are only three rules for writing sums on the score sheet:

  1. The chosen row must be the same color as one of the rolled dice.
  2. The numbers in the row must increase from left to right (leaving blank spaces is allowed)
  3. No duplicate numbers may appear in a single column.

Any player may choose not to write a sum on their score sheet without penalty unless they are the active player; the active player must mark one of the miss-throw fields if they choose not to add the rolled sum to their sheet. The game ends when a player has filled two rows on their score sheet or when any player has filled in their fourth miss-throw field. Players then score points equal to the number in the pentagonal field for each completed column, points equal to the right-most number in each completed row, and one point for each number in each incomplete row. Each miss-throw is negative five points. The player with the most points wins! For more information, check out The Dice Tower reviews here.

The Mind, by Wolfgang Warsch, is a team experience for two to four players. Players are attempting to complete levels by placing their cards collectively in ascending order, but here’s the catch – the players are not allowed to communicate in any way to indicate what cards they have. The game includes numbered cards 1 -100, level cards 1 -12, life cards, and shuriken cards. Players will try to complete 12/10/8 levels for 2/3/4 players. For each level, the players will be dealt a number of cards equal to the level number (1 card for level 1, 2 cards for level 2, etc.) that are kept hidden from the other players. Then, all players will try to place their cards one by one on the discard pile face up in ascending order, not knowing what cards are in the other players’ hands. If a card is placed that is higher than one still in a player’s hand, that player will call a stop, the players will lose a life, and then the level will continue. The players also have shuriken cards, that can help them make it through a level. As long as all of the players agree, a shuriken card can be used to allow all players to discard their lowest level card, which then becomes public knowledge. The game ends when the players have successfully completed all of the levels or if the players lose their last life. For more information, check out The Dice Tower reviews here.

Nyctophobia, by Catherine Stippell, is a cooperative horror-survival game for three to five players that plays in 30 – 45 minutes. Up to four players will play as the Hunted and a single player will be the Hunter. The goal of the Hunted is to make it through the forest maze to their car and survive. The Hunter will win if any of the Hunted die. Sounds fairly simple, right? Here’s the hard part – all of the Hunted players wear black out glasses so they cannot see the board and can only navigate by touch.

At the beginning of the game, the Hunter (the only player who can see the board) will set up the board based on the scenario (axe murderer or mage) and give the players the general direction of their car (north, south, west, or east), but the Hunted don’t know where they are starting in relation to the car. On the Hunted player’s turn, the Hunter will assist the Hunted by placing their hand on their player piece. Then, they can explore the surrounding spaces next to their player piece. After exploring, they’ll decide on a direction to move. This may cause them to pick up rocks that they can later throw to distract the Hunter, bump into another Hunted player allowing them to coordinate and better determine their location in the forest, or run into the Hunter, taking damage. Each Hunted only has two health. The Hunter uses a deck of cards to determine their movement on their turn, but has certain rules they must follow, such as heading towards any noise markers (from thrown rocks) on the board.

There are two versions of the Hunter: the axe murderer and the mage. The ax murderer can chop down trees to get to the Hunted faster while the mage can manipulate the forest, moving trees and rotating the entire map, to confuse the players. To see more, check out the GAMA 2018 video here.

In Kick-Ass: The Board Game, based off the comic book by Mark Millar and John Romita Jr., is a  1 – 4 player game that can be played in 60 – 90 minutes. Players are working cooperatively to save New York City from the super-villain Boss and his minions. Each round, the players will travel to the different districts, beating up the minions, performing good deeds for the citizens, and trying to balance their crime-fighting and social lives. Once the players have successfully resolved three events (in a standard game, two for a shorter game), they’ll face off against the super-villain boss. If they can defeat the super-villain, they win and save New York City.

Players can choose one of seven unique heroes and one of five different bosses, each with their own evil plot, to fight in their game. All of the heroes, bosses, mini-bosses, and minions are all represented with miniatures (45 in total). You can watch a preview from the CMON Expo here.

Due to the upcoming expiration of their current licensing term, Fantasy Flight Games has announced that starting October 22, 2018, they will no longer offer any Android: Netrunner The Card Game products for sale, including playmats and card sleeves.

However, before the end, there is one more expansion being released: Reign and Reverie deluxe expansion. This expansion will include cards for every faction and celebrates all things Android: Netrunner. With the end of Android: Netrunner The Card Game, Organized Play will also be drawing to a close and more information for Organized Play and the final Android: Netrunner World Championship can be found here.

Fantasy Flight Games launched Android: Netrunner The Card Game in 2012 and has given players a total of two core sets, a campaign expansion, five deluxe expansions, and eight cycles of Data Packs. Not all is lost for the worlds of Android, as Fantasy Flight Games stated that those worlds will continue to be explored in future products. To read more, including thoughts from Lead Developer Michael Boggs and Head of Studio Andrew Navaro, click here.

Crystal Clans is an expandable two player battle card game. Each player selects a unique clan to battle with and tries to outwit their opponent for control of powerful crystals. The first player to gain four crystals wins. Now, two new clans are joining the original six to add even more variety to the base game: the Shadow Clan and the Fang Clan.

The Shadow Clan excels in surprise attacks and working alone, instead of in large squads, with their signature Shadow Step ability. This ability gives many of the units incredible range to attack the opponent anywhere on the board for a very low cost, but then they’ll only have that single unit to fight with.

“Clan Signature Ability: Shadow Step – As an action, if there are no other units in this squad, you may spend 1 initiative to place this unit in a zone that contains an enemy squad but no friendly squad.”

The Fang Clan is extremely powerful but at a cost. Each of their Alphas have individual abilities that need to be considered when organizing your squads, such as abilities that force you to discard from your draw pile or not be able to take a score action. Players will need to carefully consider their options when using their signature Alpha ability.

“Clan Signature Ability: Alpha – Whenever this squad is reordered, summoned to, or combined, an Alpha unit must become the top unit of the squad. After any action, if this squad’s top card is not an Alpha unit, you must immediately reorder this squad.”

You can read more about the cards in the Shadow Clan and the Fang Clan on Plaid Hat Games website. If you haven’t played the base game, you can check out The Dice Tower reviews.

The Dice Dungeon is a two player game that takes approximately 20 minutes to play. In the game, each player sits across from each other with a 3D “Dungeon Waffle” in between. Each player’s goal is to be the first to build a path from one end of the dungeon to the other and have the means to make it through with the right equipment and end with more experience points than their opponent. Alternating turns, each player will draw and roll one die from the dice bag. If you roll a map face, you’ll add it to the Dungeon Waffle, choosing which map side faces you and which faces your opponent, as well as the orientation. Spells and equipment can be kept in front of you. Spells will let you manipulate dice already in the dungeon while equipment will give you the means to make it through locked doors and enemies at the end. Wish rings allow you to choose any face on that die to use and Wondrous Items allow you to exchange it with one of your opponents spells or items, or can be saved for bonus experience points at the end of the game. The game ends when either player declares that they have completed a path through the dungeon and have the necessary equipment to successful traverse that path or when either player is unable to draw a die from the dungeon bag. The player with the most experience points wins.

The campaign includes stretch goals that will offer a three player Triple Waffle and a four player Waffle Cross. For more information, you can check out the campaign here.